I should have died - Brendan Parkes story


Why support QIMR Berghofer?

We need your help to save lives 

Today, it would be unthinkable to be without the modern medical treatments that have been made available through the application and brilliance of dedicated scientists in years gone by.  Our passion, commitment and energy is what makes us one of Australia’s largest and most successful medical research institutes. QIMR Berghofer can be credited for more than half a century of work at the forefront of Australia's effort to prevent, detect and treat disease. Through our accomplishments, QIMR Berghofer has become a symbol of hope, not just for Queenslanders, but all people, everywhere.

Every day at QIMR Berghofer we have over 700 scientists and support staff undertaking research in more than 50 specialised laboratories. We have exceptional people with world-class skills and dedication, but they can't do it without the backing of their community.    

Every dollar counts...

For every one dollar we receive from research funding grants, we need another 65 cents to make the research happen. 

We rely on you to help us bridge this funding gap. Your generosity helps us take our laboratory discoveries through to clinical practice where they can then change lives. There are so many ways you can help us. To find out more, please read here.

We are committed to research that makes a difference...

  • 1 in 2 Australians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. At QIMR Berghofer, half of our laboratories are devoted to researching cancer.
  • Infectious diseases continue to cause terrible illness, and millions of adults and children die globally each year. QIMR Berghofer researches numerous infectious diseases and our work in malaria, Ross River virus and dengue fever has been recognised by the World Health Organization.
  • Dementia is a growing concern for many families today. QIMR Berghofer's mental health program is pioneering a revolutionary new approach to mental health research.
Support our groundbreaking research today.